Writing: 7 Ways to Cure the Dumbs

Recently I’ve been experiencing a pretty extreme case of the dumbs. man-869215_1920People battling the dumbs often have a difficult time performing ordinary tasks: like replying to emails, speaking in full sentences, or remembering that their spouse asked them to pick up that thing at that place for an immediately forgotten but very, very important reason.

Writing has been painful this month. And, when I say painful, I mean that writing has been like pulling teeth. If the teeth were attached to my eyeballs, and my eyeballs were on fire, and I was being dipped slowly into piranha infested lava.

Despite the leaps and bounds made in today’s technological age, the dumbs are hitting people harder than ever. Information is readily available. Forget the name of your hellion’s teacher? Look it up on the school website. Want to learn how to cook the perfect scrambles eggs? Watch a Gordon Ramsey tutorial on YouTube. Need to know the name of the song playing over the radio? Shazam will tell you.

Retain much of that information?

Forget it.

A wide number of independent studies led by psychologists, neurobiologists, and educators have found the web is actually changing our brains. The online world promotes hasty reading, hurried and distracted thinking, and superficial learning. Yes, the Internet opens access to an unfathomable amount of information, but it’s also turning us into shallow thinkers with less of a need to exercise our brains by storing the information we seek for use later.

And don’t get me started on shows like The Bachelor and Keeping Up With the Kardashians, which make society dumber as a whole.sub-buzz-2156-1484677751-3

A recent study done in the University of Texas actually found that the mere presence of smartphones where we can see them — regardless of if they’re ringing or on silent mode, facedown –dramatically reduces brain power.

The dumbs can hit working authors harder than anyone. When we aren’t allocating large portions of time to surfing the web for research on our current WIPs (or watching the Kardashians while we’re supposed to be), the very act of sitting in front of a monitor all day to write can be damaging to our brains (and eyes) all on its own. Not only that, it increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes, depression, and obesity.

So, how do we beat the effects of extended computer use?

How do we overcome “the dumbs?”

1. Eat Properly

Eating too much junk food affects the way you think, negatively affecting brain synapses and several molecules directly related to learning and memory.

Increase your brain function by adding these “smart” foods to your daily eating regimen: Blueberries, wild salmon, nuts and seeds, avocados, whole grains, beans, pomegranate juice,  freshly brewed tea, and dark chocolate.

2. Get Plenty of Rest

The need for sleep can vary between individuals, but most people require between 7 and 8 1/2 hours per day. 

People who are exposed to sleep loss can experience a decline in cognitive performance and changes in mood. Sleep deprivation can often lead to a rise in blood pressure and a decrease in things like metabolism and immune response.

Side note: the proper amount of sleep can help the way our bodies respond to stress.

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Writers? Stressed? Never.

3. Take Breaks

A five minute break every hour to throw in a load of laundry, walk your dog, or toss some food in the slow cooker will improve your brain function and general well-being. Unsure whether Harry and Melinda end up together or Melinda runs off with Ricco? Making decisions like these all day can wear down your ability to reason, leading to simplistic decision making and procrastination (not to mention bad books). Breaks can restore motivation for long-term goals, productivity and creativity.

Which is great, especially for authors tackling an entire book.

4. Get Plenty of Exercise

Hellions 1 & 2, working it out.

The benefits of physical exercise, especially aerobic exercise, range from the molecular to behavioral level. Exercise releases endorphins and makes people happy.  Exercising for as little as twenty minutes per day improves information processing and memory functions.

On Sunday I opened my WIP to find myself incapable of editing a single word. I removed a word here, added another one there, and immediately erased all of the changes. My brain was peanut butter. A large part of the problem is getting the right amount of exercise in winter. I have an active job, but it’s not the same as flat-out, heart-rate topping, good old fashioned exercise. So, I went online to find a human hamster wheel, and two hours later I was setting up a brand new elliptical in my basement. Having only gone on it twice, I can already felt the effects of working out reinvigorating my brain. Writing a blog typically takes me three hours. (I’m slow, I know.) This one was finished in an hour and a half, after I had already achieved my goal of editing Old Souls for four.

5. Fuel Your Creativity

Your creativity is a living organism. If you don’t nourish it, your ability to think creatively will whither. If you find yourself incapable of working on your writing project, try passing a little time on something else. Meditate. Write something by hand. Paint. Listen to music. Daydream. (Shower daydreaming is ideal — just keep a pen nearby because you WILL forget all of your brilliant ideas the moment your hair is dry.) Laugh. Sit in a coffee shop. Drink writing wine. Loosen the hell up.

6. Talk to People

Yes, yes, we all know the vast majority of writers are introverts. But a conversation that lasts as little as ten minutes can actually increase your brain activity. In fact, simply looking at someone activates the brain’s language system. 

Keep in mind, not all conversations are beneficial. When you talk with someone you’re competing with, the cognitive benefits disappear.sheep-2372148_1920

7. Read

Reading a novel you enjoy enhances connectivity in the brain and improves brain function.

It can drastically boost a writer’s vocabulary: a good novel is a dictionary and a thesaurus crafted with the express purpose of being interesting. Novels teach a writer how to develop tension, write dialogue, and create engaging characters. They offer writers inspiration. Writing is often hell, but reading is almost always fun, IF you find the right book.


We did it! 7 Ways to Overcome the Dumbs. Now we’re all just a little bit smarter.

Do YOU experience winter dumbs? What are your best tips and tricks to rally cognitive function?


Author Alter Egos and the Future of Scribbles

interscope-records-eminem-new-albumI watched a video on Facebook the other day chronicling Eminem’s rise to superstardom from the trailer park. (Yes, I WAS avoiding work on Old Souls, thank you SO  for pointing that out.) I planned to link the video to this post, but like so many other things on Facebook, it seems to have fallen into a rather unfindable abyss. The video detailed the struggles the rapper endured throughout his childhood: his mother’s abuse, and the bullying he was subjected to as a white kid in a predominantly black community.

He began rapping as a means to cope. He memorized the dictionary. He entered rap-battles.


And he lost.


It wasn’t until Eminem adopted an alter ego that he became a household name. Slim Shady was the man who made us all stand up. He took hold of the rap scene in 1999, and held on with murderously tight death grip for years afterward.

The narrator went on to allege Eminem would not have risen to the success he achieved if not for the invention of Slim Shady. Is that true? Maybe. And, Marshall Mathers III’s alter ego wasn’t the only one to peak public interest. So did Lady Gaga’s. Where would Sean Combs be without the media firestorms incited by the billion times he’s changed his name over the years? That said, not all alter egos work well. Garth Brooks is a country super star. Chris Gaines? Kind of a schmuck.SCHMUCK.png

In any event the video got me to wonder, could authors benefit from having alter egos?

In today’s day and age, writers have to do pretty much everything. They have to write books (already very hard) and they have to promote themselves. YOU want to be a writer? You’re going to need to get on Goodreads. You need to blog, tweet, Flipboard, stumble and Facebook. You need to appear at Writing Conferences and book signings. You need to have Swagger in the Age of the Author Brand.

Authors have a reputation for being *cough* slightly introverted. The other thing we’re known for? A little thing called Impostor Syndrome. “Impostor syndrome refers to the feelings of fraud and self-doubt often experienced by high-level achieving individuals.”


The unfortunate news for WRITERS is that we don’t have to achieve high levels of success to feel like impostors. The mere admission that we’re *gasp* WRITING can cause us to break out in a cold sweat.


That means that in the age of the author brand, introvertism (I don’t think that’s a real word) and Impostor Syndrome have a very real shot of crushing our writerly careers before they even begin.

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It might also be a picture of me trying to get upstairs on my birthday. Who’s to say, really?

I chose to use the moniker J. A. in place of the words people usually toss my way (Jenny, why are you late again) for two reasons. One: so that I could protect my real identity when I rocketed to superstardom — an obviously very likely scenario — and two: so that it would take people a little bit longer (like a half a second) to figure out I was a woman when they picked up my book.  At the time I believed the general public preferred male fantasy writers over female ones. While planning to write this blog, I held a Twitter poll.

Screenshot 2018-01-08 at 12.15.01 PM

The results were eye-opening. To me, anyway. I was surprised even further when some Twitter followers (men included) commented on the poll, saying that for various reasons, they would actually be more likely to purchase a book written by a woman than a man. Which makes the 12% of people who said they would be less likely to purchase a book written by a woman virtually obsolete.

Which in turn, led to my next Twitter poll.

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I was baffled. When I shop for books in a bookstore, I look at the covers. If the cover looks good enough, I’ll pick up the book to read the blurb. IF I make it past the blurb, the book gets opened, and the author bio gets studied. Only after the author bio passes the test will I CONSIDER flipping through the pages.


Is this because I’m a writer? I don’t know. Many of the people who follow me on Twitter and participated in the poll are writers. I think. Well, they say they are. The majority could very well be robots.


OR, is it because we writers have a FALSE perception that people are thinking about our PERSONAL worthiness before examining the quality of our work?

Wait a minute . . .

Is that where our impostor syndrome comes from?

*pauses*

*clears throat*

The polls seem to suggest that who the writer is is becoming less important than ever before. Yes, we’ll rush out to buy a book by the authors we love . . . but, their accomplishments? Whether or not they have a master’s degree in English? Whether they’re male of female?

Not important.

Because Old Souls is not quite finished, I wondered what this information means to me as a blogger. Which (of course) led me back to my new favorite obsession: Twitter polling. screenshot-2018-01-08-at-12-54-19-pm.png

Hardly anyone participated in this poll, which was too bad because the results were the most interesting to me, personally. Seeing that this was my third poll in three days, maybe people were tired of all the questions. Or, maybe this particular poll didn’t ruffle as many feathers as the male vs. female question. In any event, based on these stats it would seem that people pick up books based on the appeal of the content. People follow blogs to get to know the author.

I’ve been considering changing up the format of Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins for some time. Outside of the summer Scribble Challenges, the theme of the site has generally revolved around my writerly insecurities and attempts to get over them. The problem is I’m getting kind of tired of writing about that. That means, YOU’RE probably getting kind of tired of reading about it. Which is WHY I’ve been considering an author alter ego to go along with my authorly moniker, J. A.

(By the way, J. A. is always on time for everything.)

That said, I’m not about to tie you to the bed and set the house on fire. My alter ego will not be all that different from me. I will still be Mother of Hellions, Hater of Spiders, and Drinker of Wine. I’ll still be an aspiring kicka$# author.


But I will also be confident.

Because writers need to be confident.


41% of voters admitted they don’t follow author blogs, eliminating the necessity of including their feedback in this change to Scribbles — which is a blog. (Haters gonna hate.) But, a whopping 39% of voters said they follow blogs to get to know more about the author.

Bearing that in mind, Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins will likely get a little more personal.GIVE THE PEOPLE WHAT THEY WANT


But not too personal.

Nobody wants to hear the nitty gritty.

Think: late night talk show personal.


I’ve also been considering adding a writer interview series to the site. Why I Write would be a more INTIMATE look into the forces driving individual authors to create, and the influences that helped mold their perspectives on life and the world today. The authors would (of course) have an opportunity to promote their work, but the bulk of the interview questions would take a more personal approach.

Depending on interest, this series of interviews might begin as early as February.

So, if you’re a writer interested in being featured on Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins, shoot me an email!


ScribblesonCocktailNapkins@gmail.com


And hey, if you’re a blogger, I want to know, what do YOU blog about? How do you keep your readers ENGAGED? What do you think about the necessity of author ALTER EGOS?


 

The Storm

Summer storms are one of the things I miss most from the prairies.

They’re rare on Prince Edward Island, but they happen occasionally. I woke up to thunder a few nights ago.  A huge crack of it, right outside our bedroom window. I had a hard time sleeping after that. Weird dreams.

And the next day, I had this weird-ass story.


—read best as it was written, while listening to Lana Del Rey


“It’s too hot to sleep.”


I swept Cruise’s hair away from his face. He lay on top of the blankets, naked with the exception of his beloved Spiderman underwear, staring up at me in the candlelight, his seven-year-old features gleaming under a sheen of sweat.

“You won’t notice the heat once you fall asleep, baby.” I leaned with a kiss for the top of his head and smiled. Standing, I returned his book to the shelf and took the candle from the top of his dresser. “They’ll probably have the power on by morning. I’ll make you toast with cinnamon and brown sugar for breakfast.”

“You’re trying to bribe me,” he said, pulling a stuffed dragon with oversized eyes close to his chest. “It won’t work.”

“You need to sleep. It’s time.”

“Good night, Momma.”

“Love you, kiddo.”

Ben tossed his cell phone on the coffee table as I entered the living room. Placing Cruise’s candle next to it, I sank onto the opposite side of the couch.

“Who were you talking to?” I asked, glancing at his phone, forcing an air of lightness into the question.

“No one.” He offered a quick smile. Something had been bothering him all week. He’d been playing it off, but after seventeen years together, the signs were easy to spot. The strained conversation. The way he rolled toward the opposite side of the room when we went to bed. “I was just playing Sudoku. Battery’s out now. I’ll have to wait for the power to come back.”

I lifted my feet onto the ottoman. “I wish we had a generator, at least for the air conditioner. I can feel your body heat from here.” Fanning myself with a magazine from the basket on the floor, I asked, “What do you think happened to the power, anyway?”

Living so deep in the country had its advantages. Cruise, Lily, and Grace were free to roam the meandering trails on their four-wheelers in summer and on the snowmobiles in winter, paid for with the money left over after trading the cramped, million-dollar condo in Vancouver for our sprawling acreage in Saskatchewan. Nestled so far in the woods, we had no neighbors. Ben converted the old barn across the yard into a studio with large windows that invited the natural light he so coveted to brighten his herculean canvases. background-2439018_1920I had turned the spare bedroom into the office I’d always dreamt of and, after quitting my job as a content writer, the free time I needed to complete my second novel. The kids all had their own rooms. The move granted us everything we could ever want out here, and while I never once regretted leaving British Columbia the year before, I did miss how easily accessible information had been in the city. The power had been out for three hours, and we still had no idea why.

“The heat,” Ben answered. “Probably a transformer. Are Lily and Grace asleep?”

The basement stairs appeared dark. “I think so. Finally. It’s nearly midnight, they’ll be tired at school tomorrow.”

Ben’s gaze wandered back to his phone on the coffee table. He masked a frown with his hand.

“You sure everything’s okay?” I prodded, knowing it was her. It was always her.

“Yeah.” He stood. “We should go to bed, too. Not much to do without the power.”

I let out an annoyed groan, rising to my feet. “Why’s it so hot, anyway? It’s supposed to be freezing this time of year. It’s almost November, for Christ sake.” The heatwave had arrived the week before, our summer clothes having already been packed away.

Ben made his way to the living room window, wearing only a tattered pair of shorts that somehow eluded my last trip to the donation box. I enjoyed the sight of him staring into the night: the way his naked back tapered so neatly into the elastic band of his shorts.

“Ah. Who knows,” he said, his shoulders uncharacteristically tense. “Seems to be shifting though. There’s a breeze now, at least.”

I joined him at the window. He was right. A cool stream of air filtered through the screen. Closing my eyes, I enjoyed the feel of it against my face. “Tell me the truth.” I turned to face him. “Has she been messaging you again?”

The candles flickered behind us, caught in the breeze. Ben sighed. “I’m not encouraging her, Terra.”

“What’s she saying?”


“She’s been depressed. She’s . . . in a dark place.”


I crossed my arms, suddenly thankful his phone had died. There had been many reasons for the move from civilization as we knew it: the traffic, the hectic lifestyle, the endless cycle of day after day of gray skies; but leaving Helena behind to keep our family intact had been the biggest.

“How depressed?” I asked.

He lowered his head. “Before the phone died, she said . . .”

I waited, saying nothing, refusing to prod him on. It was a mess he had gotten himself into. A mess he promised was over.

Ben cleared his throat. “She picked up some sleeping pills.”

“She can’t sleep?” I asked, with a feeling that wasn’t where the conversation was going. I’d been trying to forgive Helena for stealing him away. My husband. Not because I felt she deserved forgiveness, but because my hate had consumed me the past two years. Changed me. Ben was doing everything he could to save our family. It was only fair that I tried too.

“I don’t know.” He shrugged.

“You think she would . . .”

“I don’t know.”

The world would be better off without her. I bit my lip, holding the comment in. “Would you like to call her?”

“Is there any charge in your phone?”

“No.” I answered, silently thanking Cruise for draining the battery playing Minecraft. It seemed that the seventeen hundred miles we’d travelled wasn’t enough to keep Helena from my husband. background-1177463_1920Maybe if she killed herself it would be over and done. Let her beautiful face and her flawless body rot six feet under the ground if that was what it took to keep her from my family.

Ben rubbed the back of his neck, absentmindedly flexing the muscles along his arm and the left side of his body. He was handsome. One of the handsomest men I’d ever seen. A brilliant artist. I doubted I could have forgiven another man for the pain his affair had cause me. Of course Helena was depressed. I had been depressed too, when I found out about her. Would I have killed myself? No. But then, I had the kids. Helena had nothing.

“You’re right,” I said finally. “We should go to bed.”

By the time we completed our nightly rituals of face-washing and teeth-brushing, the wind had picked up substantially.

Ben closed the bedroom windows halfway while I peed in the en-suite. He peered across the yard. “It’s getting wild out there.”

The shrubs surrounding the outer wall of the bathroom scraped the siding in the wind. I rose, pulling up my pants and flushing the toilet. Out the small window, I caught sight of the trampoline in the yard. “We should run out and take the safety net down. If it gets windy enough that thing will end up in our roof.”

Ben’s shoulder slumped. “Oh, hell. I’ll do it.”

“I can come—”

“Don’t worry about it. I’ll be right back.” He grabbed a flashlight from the closet and pulled a shirt on before making his way down the hall. In a minute backdoor slammed shut behind him. I sat on the bed. The sound of crisp autumn leaves rustled noisily though the window. I strained to see Ben climbing onto the trampoline to wrestle with the safety net in the darkness. Above, the slivered crescent of the moon was white and bright, and then it was covered by a thick patch of quickly moving cloud. The earthy, delicious smell of fast approaching rain filled the air.

Footsteps shuffled on the floor behind me. It was Cruise. The hair rose along the back of my arms. His face had paled since I’d tucked him in. His eyes were empty. Hollow.

Crossing the room, I knelt before him. “Cruise?” I refrained from touching him, remembering what the pediatrician in Vancouver had said. “Are you all right?”

He nodded. Despite his recent growth spurt, he still had a little baby fat. His little belly protruded slightly over his underwear. The innocent expression that usually brightened his baby-blue eyes was gone.

“Are you asleep, baby?” I asked. How long had it been since I’d left his room? A half-hour at most. Obviously, that was all it took. It was the second time I’d caught him sleepwalking that week.

He mumbled indiscernibly. Garbled, halting vowels and sharp constants. My pulse raced. Ben handled Cruise’s sleepwalking better than I did.

“Do you need to use the bathroom?” I asked.


He seemed to look right through me. “It’s going to storm.”


My breath caught in my throat. He talked in his sleep a hundred times before. But, his words were always mangled, as if he was speaking in tongues. I’d never been able to understand him.

His head tilted slightly to the side, blonde hair ruffled in the back from sweating against his pillow. He reached out blindly to touch my arm. “Be careful, Momma.”

I let out a quiet gasp. The words were jarringly clear, his breath a ripple of heat against my face. I swallowed, buying time, gathering myself. “It’s time for bed, baby,”

“Momma.” Cruise leaned with a whisper, sleeping blue eyes clear and wide. “She’s coming.”

A chill rose up my spine. I hesitated, staring at my only son. My sweet boy. “Who’s coming, honey?”

The backdoor slammed. Ben lumbered up the stairs. He came in breathing hard, the flashlight brightening our room. “It’s going to pour out there.” He caught sight of Cruise.

“What’s he doing up?”

screen“He’s not up.” My attention returned to Cruise. The older he grew the more he looked like his father: the same wide shoulders, square jaw, and puckered lips. He was my baby. A perfectly unspoiled replica of the man I’d fallen in love with so long before. “He’s asleep, I think.”

“I’ll take him to his bed.” Ben laid his hand on Cruise’s back to usher him slowly down the hall. “Let’s go, buddy.”

I waited for Ben to return, listening to the wind wail against the outer walls of the house. Something was banging in the distance. A door, maybe. An open gate. I retrieved the discarded flashlight and slipped past Ben speaking softly, calmly to Cruise while tucking him safe beneath his blankets, and descended the stairs to the entryway. Pushing firmly against the closed door, I turned the deadbolt sideways at the top. Ben installed it when we first moved to the acreage. The last thing we had wanted was Cruise sleepwalking out of the house in the dead of winter. I glanced into the front yard through the window. The trees swayed violently in the wind. Rain droplets spotted the glass.

Moving systematically from one room to the next, I closed the windows. Grace and Lily lay still in their rooms in the basement, breathing heavily, blissfully unaware of the coming storm.

Ben stripped to his underwear and laid down on the bed. “This rain is exactly what we need. It’ll take some of the humidity out of the air. Cruise will be fine tomorrow.”

He was right, of course. Cruise’s sleepwalking somehow always grew worse in extended periods of humidity. Laying next to Ben I let out a long breath. “I hate when Cruise talks in his sleep.”

Ben let out a sigh. “He’s fine, Terra. It’s natural. Weird, but natural.”

We blew out our candles. Ben was restless. I was certain he was thinking of Helena. There was nothing he could do from here. All the same, I could practically feel her in the bed between us. I turned to face the window. Rain came in waves against the pane. We listened to the storm separately until almost two hours had passed, and Ben’s breathing became heavy. Sleep came slower for me. Now and then my body became weightless, my thoughts setting adrift as the edges of my consciousness began to soften.

I’d only seen Helena once, across a busy street. She’d been with Ben, coming out of a hotel paid for with our credit card. She was prettier than me. A couple years older. He told me she was an artist, like him. An artist like Ben, who felt deeper than other people. Loved harder.

Could she have loved him more than I did? Did it matter? He was mine. Maybe she was lying to him about the pills; using whatever means necessary to pull him back into her web. Maybe she wouldn’t take the them.


And maybe she would.


Oh God, I hoped she would.

I imagined her sitting in her condo, her shining black hair pulled into a perfect bun on the very top of her head, rolling the bottle of pills back and forth across the coffee table with the tips of her thin fingers. I willed her to open them. I willed her to pick up the glass of Malbec I pictured beside her.

It’ll be easier if you do it, Helena.

Rain pounded against the roof. Wind whipped at the walls. Weightless, weightless, weightless. My awareness drifted, euphoria closing in as sleep worked to erase Ben’s lover from my mind.

My eyes fluttered open. A slow roll of thunder moved in like an animal approaching in the night.

I had lifted from the bed.

Ben lay below me, still. I tried to scream his name but no sound came out. My arms and legs and head hung back, unresponsive. My chest was tight. Cramped. Expelling my soul. Forcing my consciousness outward, outward, outward. Into what? Where would my soul go if not inside my body? Uncontained, it would spill free, separate, disappear. I would be gone, just like that. And then? My body would be empty, an old house, waiting for a renter.

Another slow roll of thunder carried with it a resonance I imagined to be a woman’s voice, a woman’s scream, a battle cry in the night. I tried to yell again. Air poured freely from my lungs. No sound. Ben let out a stammered snore beneath me. Adrenaline pumped furiously from my heart. I swayed slightly, left and right, rocking in an invisible cradle, led by a force rising somewhere from my chest. texture-1697391_1280

“Ben!” I managed finally.

His eyes flew open. Could he see me in the darkness? He patted the mattress and glanced up, stiffening. Launching from the bed he stood against the wall, immediately awake. “Terra, what the fuck?”

“Help!” I reached toward him. The rocking motion intensified. I was sick, swaying back and forth above the bed, limbs flailing. “Get me down.”

The electricity surged a moment, flashing through the lights. Ben’s face appeared white beneath his stubble. He was frozen, glancing wildly around the room.

The light died out. The room seemed blacker than before.

Cruise’s shockingly blank face. She’s coming.

It wasn’t possible. I was dreaming, wasn’t I? This was my body. My husband. Mine.

Helena was lying. She wouldn’t kill herself.

“Terra!” Ben’s voice was closer. “Grab my hand.”

It was too dark to see. I swung in, arm flailing. I brushed the edge of his hand before swinging back. He grabbed me when I came in again. The energy shuttling me by my chest was too strong.

Ben let go before my arm could snap. Back I went. The motion grew manic. I was swung like a pendulum, back and forth and back again. My stomach rolled. “Ben!”

“Tell me what to do, Terra!”

What could he do?

I imagined myself to be a sponge trying to reabsorb my soul; focusing on breathing in and out and in again: using my lungs to pull the spilled me back. My body. I was released. Flung onto the floor. There was a crunch. Something hard protruded beneath my back. Pain screamed from my ribs. I’d landed on something. The flashlight?

Ben rushed to me. “What happened?” He held me by my shoulders. “What the fuck was that?”


I couldn’t bring myself to say it.


Her name.

I said the only thing I could. “I don’t know.”

There was a bang from downstairs. A door slamming. Grace screamed. I pushed Ben backward, trying to stand. A warm stream drained from my ribs down the back of my nightgown. A surge of pins and needles accosted my limbs.

Ben moved to the dresser. A match flared across the room. The candle was immediately snuffed out. It remained lit on the third attempt. Ben and I made our way down the stairs quickly, Ben guarding the wildly flickering flame with his hand. A clap of thunder shook the house, loud, and long, and close.

Helena was in it.

She was all around us now.

I held onto Ben’s arm as he opened Grace’s door. “Honey?”

Wind blasted the curtains out from her open window. Our eldest daughter shuffled back in her bed, long hair wildly disheveled. Both girls took after me more than their father; with the same mousy hair, and extra flesh around the waist and hips.

“Sorry,” she  panted. “The thunder scared me. The wind blew my door shut.”

light-1985200_1920At fourteen, Grace rarely looked like a child anymore. Now it was all I saw. I raced past Ben to embrace her, eager for an excuse to hold another person, heart hammering heavily beneath my breast. Ben closed the window with a thud.

“Why’d you open the window?” I asked Grace, holding her soft frame tight.

“It was open when I went to bed.”

“I know.” I glanced at Ben. “I closed it.”

Lily padded in, rubbing her eyes. “What’s going on?” She was two years younger than Grace, but unlike her older sister she appeared unfazed by the storm. Thunder roared around us. The basement windows flashed bright.

Slam, slam, slam. The bedroom doors blew shut upstairs.

Wind ripped through the house. Had every window opened?

Ben blinked. “Cruise!”

I pulled Grace’s hand. She shimmied from the blankets. Ben raced up the stairs past the front door to check Cruise’s room. The girls and I stayed on the steps. I looked up at the lock. The knob was vertical. Open, and intact. It had to have been turned from the inside. But, by who? Cruise wasn’t tall enough. He was only seven.

Only seven. Pure, and good, and mine.

“Ben,” I yelled. “Is he up there?”

Lily took my hand. “What’s going on?”

“Daddy’s just checking Cruise,” I answered, as calmly as I could. “Ben!”

He rounded the corner, panicked. “He isn’t there.”

Thunder clapped, retreating. Seconds passed. Lighting illuminated the front door. Something was written on the surface, scrawled deep into the wood.

Mine.


Split Ends and House Flies


They say you need to write every day. I don’t necessarily believe that—mainly because I can’t write every day.


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Shut up Jean-Luc.

Like most aspiring authors, I have a day job. I have a (very) busy family life, errands to run, a house to maintain, and air to breathe. Writing every day just isn’t feasible at this stage of the game.

And, writing in summer? Impossible.

Taking two months off my WIP was a decision I made to ensure the hellions enjoyed their annual eight weeks of freedom. I’m glad I did. My oldest is eleven. In a few years, he might not want to spend his school vacation camping/beaching/laser-tagging with his parents. Now, he does. And I want to spend time with him, too.

All that said, I am fully aware that maintaining a consistent writing schedule is enormously beneficial to writers at every stage. Perhaps all-too-fully aware of it now, as I sit at my computer trying, trying, trying to get words to magically jump from my fingertips onto the computer screen. Getting back into a regular writing schedule after an extended period of time off is hard as hell. Like any skill, the ability to communicate clearly and concisely degrades without practice. Those who don’t write often risk a dramatic step-back in their very ability to work.


Boo-bloody-hoo.

Writing is hard. We all know it.


Life happens. We all have jobs. We all have bills, stress, and the very human desire to socialize every now and then. What separates an author from a wannabe is the ability to get back on the writing horse and stare at the blinking cursor until it starts to move.
Today, I tried to write for three hours AND NOTHING HAPPENED.

Well, that’s not true. A fly buzzed around me as if willfully trying to drive me insane for an hour and a half . . . until I finally killed it. Has-Only-1-Day-Of-Life-Spends-It-All-Trolling-You-Funny-Fly-MemeThen I ate lunch. Then I divided the splitting ends of my hair for fifteen minutes, thinking about Sean Spicer’s appearance on the Emmys last night.

I finally settled on attacking a blog post, because I didn’t really want to think about Sean Spicer anymore and it was obvious it just wasn’t an Old Souls kind of day.


But you know what? Tomorrow I’ll work on my book again.

One day soon I’ll get back into my writing groove.

A little while after that I’ll finish Old Souls.


And it all will have happened solely because I didn’t give up today.


Falling into Gear


The rain is falling outside my window, and for what seems like the first time in months, I can hear it.


Two hours ago I dropped the hellions off at school.  Today my sons head to grades six, five, and two. It’s been a busy eight weeks, filled with days of trampoline parks, camping, laser tag, mini-golf, water-gun fights, and theme parks.


I love summer. I’m not going to lie.


walkway-2030319_1920.jpgI love watching the hellions play soccer and baseball, seeing their hair turn bright blonde and their cheeks become freckled and tanned. I love heat, and Prince Edward Island beaches, and sprinklers on lawns, and the smell of freshly cut grass.

I love everything about summer. Even the storms. Especially the storms, even though they can be hard to hear over the gentle roar of every neighborhood kid in a ten block radius descending on my kitchen to raid the cupboards like a swarm of locusts attacking a crop.

But, I have to admit that fall isn’t so bad, either.

Near the end of every summer I get the same old itch. A creative current seems to electrify the air. And, even though I enjoy spending summer vacation with the boys, every night for the last two weeks I’ve been fantasizing about what life will be like when they head back to school. This morning I woke up up early to go for a run. The sun wasn’t up, so I promptly threw that idea out the window. (Maybe tomorrow?) I got the hellions ready for the day and out the door. Soon, I’ll take a shower, begrudgingly devote an hour to housework, and finally sit down to work on Old Souls.

The goal is four hours a day six days a week of writing, one hour a day five days a week on social media–including the work I put into Scribbles–and, at least a half hour every day of reading.


A couple exciting things are set to happen in the next two months.


I’ve contributed a story to an anthology, The Box Under the Bed, that will be released on Amazon October 1st. (It’s available for pre-order now, btw.) My submission, Cassie, will be featured alongside the spooky stories of twenty spectacular indie authors, just in time for black cat season. The anthology has been compiled and edited by best-selling Amazon author Dan Alatorre, who many of you will recognize as a regular here on Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins.

Shortly after the book’s release, I’m heading to Altamonte Springs to present two workshops at the Florida Writer’s Conference. (And hey, you can register for that here and find out more about my workshops here.)

But, even more exciting than that is while the boys take their hell-raising act to school, Old Souls will once again receive the attention it deserves. The characters will come back to life in my imagination, and soon, they’ll be living and breathing in the imagination of others, too.

Because the book is nearly ready to slip back into the trusted grip of my critique partners. And you know what happens after that?


Publication!


(JOKING.)being-a-writer-its-easy-its-like-riding-a-bike-men-s-t-shirt

There are still a few steps to go after that. But we’ll get there.

Until then, you can expect a more consistent posting schedule here. I’ll be uploading more short stories this year than in previous years. And, as Old Souls becomes tighter, I’ll be able to release a few more deleted scenes. I’m hoping to host quite a few guest blogs too, so: if you have a piece you’d like to share, shoot an email to me at scribblesoncocktailnapkins@gmail.com.

I’m excited to kick the upcoming writing year into full gear.


As always, thanks for coming along for the ride.


J. A.


#SSC 15/ June 18-24th


It’s here!

The Final Scribble Challenge of 2017.


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The last challenge of the season is based on something our family has been experiencing. One of the hellions talks in his sleep. It’s generally limited to sentence or two, most of which is completely unintelligible.

It’s the same for the characters of your prompt. But, one night the child says something the parents understand. Something entirely unexpected. They come to realize their little one isn’t sleep-talking at all, but rather, a being is speaking THROUGH them.

Your submission should contain the line (or two) of dialogue, as well as the parents’ reaction when they realize who or what has been attempting to communicate for so long.


RULES OF THE CHALLENGE:

  1. Participants have until Saturday, June 17th at noon, Eastern standard time to post ONE response to the prompt in the comment section of THIS POST.
  2. ENCOURAGE other scribblers. Try to comment (reply) to at least three other submissions during the week.
  3. As usual, after the Saturday deadline, players have a week to VOTE for their favorite submission by emailing: Sundayscribblechallenge@gmail.com. Place the lucky author’s name in the HEADER of your email.

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NOW to announce the winner of the 13th Scribble Challenge, where the main character was buried alive. After a few hours the victim heard what sounded like digging in the dirt. He or she soon realized the sound was coming from BENEATH them. Participants were to write the next line of dialogue, whether it came from the victim or their guest.

The votes were tallied, and the winner of #SSC 13 is Sarah Brentyn!


Sarah’s snappy submission:aaa

Sarah has been invited to write a post here, on Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins. We can’t wait to see what she comes out with!


*Remember, the primary focus of the #SSC is to help authors forge connections within the writing community. So, if you respond to this week’s prompt, just remember to comment (reply) to a minimum of THREE other entries before voting opens on Saturday, June 17th.

Get to know each other!

These challenges are coming to an end, so take a look at one another’s sites now.